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How to use NFC to trigger Apple Shortcuts

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A few months back, I saw an option in Apple Shortcuts to use an NFC to trigger a shortcut. Intrigued, I investigated How to use NFC to trigger Apple Shortcuts and found that NFC tags are inexpensive and easy to set up.

What is an NFC Tag?

A Near Field Communication tag is a small chip that responds when in proximity of an NFC reader. The chip is normally embedded into something like a label, coin sized token or credit card sized plastic card. Most mobile phones include NFC functionality as they use it for contactless payment.

Where can I get an NFC Tag?

I purchased mine from Amazon with the product being made by NFCTagify using an NXP chip.

Setting up NFC to trigger Apple Shortcuts

  1. On your iPhone, open the Shortcuts app
  2. Press Automation from the bottom bar
  3. Press + in the top right
  4. Select Create Personal Automation
  5. Scroll down and select NFC
  6. Press Scan
  7. Present the NFC tag near your camera on the back of the phone.
  8. When prompted, name the tag and press ok
  9. Press Next
  10. Let’s define what happens with the NFC tag is tapped. Press Open App
  11. Select an app to open.
  12. Press Next
  13. Uncheck ask before running
  14. Press Done

Testing time: present the NFC tag to your phone and watch your select app open.

NFC Ideas

I have found a few uses for NFC to trigger shortcuts

  • Place an NFC tag on the desk and tap it with a phone to toggle the lights on and off.
  • Use an NFC tag next to each childs bed, tapping the phone on the tag gets the bedroom ready for story time.
  • NFC tag on the bedside table to toggle the lights on and off.
  • Stick an NFC tag on the coffee table to set the lights and turn on the television.

Share your uses in the comments

Tell me what you think in the comments below or on twitter @timdixon82

By Tim Dixon

Tim Dixon has worked in IT for over 20 years, specifically within the Testing Inspection and Certification industry. Tim has Cone Dystrophy, a progressive sight loss condition that impacts his central vision, colour perception and makes him sensitive to light. He likes to share his experience of life and how he navigates the abyss of uncertainty.

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